July 19, 2024
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CMD Spotlight: What’s New in Bunion Surgery?

Over the last year, new techniques in bunion surgery have evolved. These methods allow for much smaller skin incisions and tissue dissection, which in turn yield less postoperative pain, quicker return to normal activity, and of course better cosmetic results.

The operative goal of bunion surgery when conservative measures have failed is to restore normal foot position and alignment. Those who suffer from bunion deformities often have an enlarged bump on the inside of the foot and find it difficult to fit into normal-sized shoes. Actually, patients find it difficult to find shoes altogether that fit properly.

Traditionally, bunion surgery requires a 4-6cm skin incision, various amounts of tissue dissection, variable amounts of postoperative swelling and pain, and usually 2-8 weeks until the patient has returned to a sneaker.

Minimally invasive bunion surgery now allows for an incision 1-2cm, quicker healing times and therefore an overall quicker return to normal walking and activity.

Here at CMD we use the MiniBunion system. One of the main reasons bunion-sufferers avoid surgery is concerns about how long they will be off their feet, unable to take care of their responsibilities.

This is why CrossRoads® Extremity Systems developed the miniBunionTM procedure, a cutting-edge minimally invasive technique to treat painful bunions. Unlike traditional procedures, minimally invasive techniques like the miniBunionTM technique require a small incision 2 to 4 times smaller than a standard technique and involve much less trauma to the soft tissues surrounding the toes. This spares the blood supply to the bones and allows less pain, a smaller scar and faster recovery than open bunion surgeries.

Our patients have been very pleased with their scar, or lack thereof, as well as how little pain they were in after surgery. Post surgery, patients are placed in a special boot or shoe until four weeks from surgery, but this can vary. Our patients have reported that by week two, even in the special shoe, they were able to do many of their normal activities of daily living without discomfort.

If you have been avoiding bunion surgery and would like to know more about this procedure, please visit minibunion.com or call our office to schedule a consultation with our foot and ankle experts.

By Daniel Popowitz, DPM, FACFAS

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