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Saturday, October 24, 2020
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Food & Wine

Bourbon-Braised Short Ribs

My number-one most popular meat recipe. Most likely because of the copious amount of bourbon required to make it, but not really. It’s because it’s delicious.

Ingredients:

  • 5 lb (2 kg) short ribs
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Nadiv Winery: Noble, Elegant Wines for Rosh Hashanah

It was a pleasure for my group to taste five selections from Nadiv Winery, a relatively new winery on the Israeli wine scene, and from which many in our group had not tasted or heard much. Its first vintage was released in 2014, and I had not tasted any since 2018, when I first tried their three

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La Forêt Blanche, a New Winery With an Ancient Connection to the Beit HaMikdash

This summer, the East Coast received the first fruits of La Forêt Blanche, a new winery in Israel, a few kilometers to the south of the former Livni Winery. It is located in the Yatir forest, a historic wine-growing region where the Judean desert joins with the mountains, called the Hevron

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Pesach Lessons Help Empire Prep for Chagim

With Rosh Hashanah just weeks away, many are thinking about how to make the holidays at least semi-normal. Shul is limited. So are guests. But thanks to the actions Empire Kosher took when the pandemic began, Jewish cooks can be pretty confident of having a proverbial chicken in every Yom Tov pot. There won’t be a mad

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Spinach Salads for Summer

By Sybil Kaplan

Spinach may have originated 2,000 years ago in Persia but is native to central and western Asia. It is high in many vitamins and minerals, especially A and K and iron. Raw spinach is 91% water, 4% carbs and 3% protein.

Here are some salads that go well with summer dishes.

My Favorite Spinach
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Creative Quarantine Recipes, Part Two

Burek

When restaurants closed, and dining at home was “in” once again, sisters Meital and Adi Hirschkorn of Teaneck took it upon themselves to turn their home into a five-star restaurant for their family. The Hirschkorns experimented with cuisine from

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Creativity With Muffin Tins

It is really a hot summer, and I was trying to think of creative ways to make and serve food. I took this idea from the online Food & Wine column and “kashered” the recipes. They should delight children and adults alike.

The word muffin was first found in print in 1703, possibly from the

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A History of Jews and Chocolate

Smooth. Aromatic. Rich. Decadent. Food of the Gods. These are just some of the adjectives used to describe one of the world’s – and Jews’ – favorite foods. Chocolate. And while chocolate is now enjoyed throughout the world, its cultivation began circa 1500 B.C.E in what is now Mexico by the Olmec, which was the

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Learn to Make Special Occasion Cakes With Melissa Alt and Caking Art

Cakes have always been a focal point of celebrations. Who hasn’t said ‘Happy Birthday’ or ‘Mazel Tov’ with a cake?

Melissa Alt, who lives in New York City and grew up in Teaneck, learned to bake from her mother and grandmother. She began making custom cakes as a side business

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From My Kosher Jerusalem Kitchen: Forgiving Salmon

I love this quote from an article “Salmon and the Jews” by Noah and Rae Bernamoff (October 12, 2012, myjewishlearning.com) “Salmon is the quintessential Jewish food…The great thing about salmon is that it’s so forgiving. Any beginner cook knows this; even if you leave it under the broiler too long, it still comes out

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Variation on Slaw for Summer

Cole slaw comes from the Dutch koolsla, meaning cabbage salad, a term that arose in the 18th century. Adding mayonnaise was introduced in the mid-18th century. Variations are known in Germany, Italy, Poland, Russia, the Ukraine, Sweden and the United Kingdom. One website said cole slaw is “the quintessential

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The Andalusian Cold Soup Salad: An Idiosyncratic Take on Gazpacho

Gazpacho, Spain’s cold tomato-vegetable soup, has become a staple part of America’s summer diet. One sees gazpacho and variations of it everywhere—in tony (and not so tony) restaurant menus, in glossy food magazines, and in the takeout aisles of grocery stores. However, in 1939, when Charles H. Barker published his culinary

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