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Sunday, October 24, 2021
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Health Link

A COVID Patient Interview

(Courtesy of SMGH) “Today, I am going to interview a patient who contracted COVID, even after having the vaccines,” said George Matyjewicz, PhD, community liaison with St. Mary’s General Hospital. “Here’s a case of a person who followed all the precautions and still got COVID. However…”

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The South Rises: Rehabilitative Medicine Will Change the Negev Narrative

In August 2020, while families around the globe bemoaned the forced cancellations of their summer vacations thanks to the “Novel Coronavirus,” our family embarked on an exciting adventure. As others remained housebound, making the most of a very unusual summer, we were homeward bound, making aliyah to enhance our spiritual

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How PEMF Therapy Healed an Entire Family

The source of almost any illness or complaint is at the cellular level. From chronic physical pain to depression and anxiety, cellular dysfunction leads to all manner of issues. When cells can’t do their job properly, the mind and body can’t reach optimal well-being.

Harnessing the power of

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Popular Artificial Sweeteners May Cause Digestive Disease and Discomfort, According to Ben-Gurion University Researchers

(Courtesy of Americans for Ben Gurion University) Artificial sweeteners found in many foods, sports supplements and beverages could be causing long-term digestive disease and discomfort, according to researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU).

The team’s findings, published in the

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What Causes Many Diseases and What You Can Do About It

What do hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, arthritis, diabetes, many cancers, migraine headaches and skin tags have in common? They are all highly associated with insulin resistance, as insulin resistance strongly contributes to all of these diseases. When we think of insulin resistance, we think of type II diabetes. In

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All We Want Is Routine, But What if That’s Also Hard?

The holiday season is behind us and we can finally breathe a sigh of relief. That exhale that includes upcoming regularly scheduled programming, no divides within the week, and weekdays followed by weekends, not mid-week Yamim Tovim followed by Shabbat.

This expansion of time, where we can finally

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An Ode to Manhattan

For the past two months, I’ve been commuting to Manhattan once a week for work. I had heard that since the COVID-19 outbreak in March 2020, New York City has been a very depressing place to be. No doubt in the early days of the coronavirus, Manhattan was a ghost town, a shadow of its former self. But when I started commuting again in

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Yamim Noraim: The Psychology of Change

That there could be a relationship between the yamim noraim and psychology shouldn’t surprise us. After a 19th century of physiological treatments for mental illness—warm baths, cold-water hosing, mesmerism, hypnotism, hysterectomy—who but a Jew, Sigmund Freud, could conceive that a person might get better by talking—and

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Sukkot, the Storm And Comfort Zones

I was recently discussing the juxtaposition of Hurricane Ida that hit our community and the upcoming holiday of Sukkot with my sister. When I think of Sukkot, I think of the Lulav and Etrog, building the Sukkah, enjoying Simchat Torah, and essentially—I think of the experience of our lives being upended.

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Disease of the Cell

Part I

Something that is not appreciated by most people—I include in this students, oncologists and scientists—is that cancer is unique among the major diseases in being a disease of the cell. Other diseases are diseases of individual organs or organ systems, and generally reflect problems that

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Sukkot During the COVID-19 Pandemic

(Courtesy of SMGH) Sukkot is a seven-day festival, also known as the Feast of Booths or the Feast of Tabernacles. It is one of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals (shalosh regalim) mentioned in the Torah. Sukkot commemorates the years that the Jews spent in the desert on their way to the Promised Land and celebrates

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Novel Biological Treatment for IBD

A novel therapeutic strategy for treating inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) would work by removing inflammation-inducing succinate molecules secreted by gut bacteria.

The method is based on findings in the biochemistry and pharmacology lab of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) Prof. Ehud Ohana

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