July 14, 2024
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July 14, 2024
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Linking Northern and Central NJ, Bronx, Manhattan, Westchester and CT

Workplace injuries are very common, whether people want to admit it or not. Some of us have jobs during which we are more likely to be injured, and for others there may repetitive strain or stress that builds up over time. How it is dealt with early on often determines how well we do afterward and what kinds of problems remain in the long run. No one wants to live with chronic pain or a decrease in function. No one wants to lose their job because they can’t do it properly, or stop doing the things that they enjoy because they can no longer suffer through the pain or other symptoms.

For many reasons, people avoid getting these things checked out. Often, at the beginning, people hope that with time their symptoms will improve or resolve. Then they think that they are tough and don’t want to admit that there is a real problem. Sometimes it is because they are afraid to find out that something is actually wrong. None of those, however, are good reasons to suffer through the pain and disability of an injury. Certainly not one that if treated early on can heal or be healed without taking too much time out of work and our personal lives, or losing much-needed income.

These are the stories that I hear every day as a hand surgeon at The Center for Hand Disorders. I see adults and children with all sorts of hand, wrist and arm injuries such as sprains and fractures, nerve and tendon problems. I see people without injuries who have chronic pain or stiffness, numbness and tingling, trouble sleeping at night, a strange clicking feeling, and the list goes on and on. I see those who come in immediately, and those who wait until they can’t take it any longer. I can tell you for sure that the best results come with early treatment, and there is no shame in admitting that something is wrong. We all like to hope that things will get better with time or that we can work through it, and sometimes we can. But sometimes they don’t or we can’t. Is that a risk worth taking? Why suffer through it? After all the time and effort we put into our jobs and our lives, can we really afford to chance it? Everyone, of course, has to answer these questions on his or her own.

I believe that anyone would agree, however, that there is no harm in simply getting something checked out. There is too much on the line not to. We all have to pay the bills, and we all have things that we love to do. We all have someone who depends on us in some way, whether financially, as a caregiver, or even just to help out. And we all need our hands to do it.

At the Center for Hand Disorders, we treat all major hand conditions, whether caused by a work-related accident, vehicle or sports injury, as well as those disabilities that arise from daily life, such as arthritis and tendon disorders. In addition to injuries and arthritis of the hand, wrist and forearm, we deal with problems such as carpal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, trigger finger and more.

From our easy online appointment scheduler and medical intake forms feature, to the comprehensive treatment provided by our staff, you will be treated to our caring and personalized services. We remain true to the motto of our practice: No Two Hands are Alike.

Dr. Michael Horowitz is a fellowship-trained hand surgeon treating patients in Englewood, Manhattan and Brooklyn. He is fellowship-trained in hand surgery and burn surgery, and specializes in the comprehensive treatment of adult and pediatric hand, wrist and arm problems. He holds membership with a number of professional organizations, including Fellowship in The American College of Surgeons, American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons, and the American Medical Association. His research has been published in numerous peer-reviewed medical journals and he has presented his work both nationally and internationally.

For his undergraduate degree, Dr. Horowitz attended CUNY Queens College in New York, where he graduated magna cum laude. His undergraduate career was marked by numerous honors, including Phi Beta Kappa and Honors in Mathematical and Natural Sciences. He continued his medical education at the SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, completing his medical degree. When he is not treating patients, Dr. Horowitz enjoys photography, tennis and running. He lives on the Upper East Side of Manhattan with his wife and four children, and often spends time off with his numerous family members in Teaneck, Bergenfield and New Milford, New Jersey.

The Center for Hand Disorders is located at 177 North Dean Street in Englewood. For more information, contact 201-510-3777 or visit their website at bergenhandsurgery.com

By Dr. Michael Horowitz

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