July 25, 2024
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July 25, 2024
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Linking Northern and Central NJ, Bronx, Manhattan, Westchester and CT

Summertime, When the Livin’ Is(n’t) So Easy

Memorial Day is in the rearview mirror, July 4th is upon us, and we are barreling into the hot heart of summer! While the hot and humid days of the season can be challenging, it is important to remember that summer is a time for joy and outdoor activities. Following the advice of Chinese medicine allows you to navigate these hurdles while feeling optimistic and motivated to enjoy the season to the fullest.

So what does Chinese medicine recommend for making the most of summer and staying healthy? Balance. Chinese medicine is all about balance and keeping Yin and Yang in Goldilocks mode, not too hot, not too cold. Hot weather (Yang) prompts craving cold (Yin), iced drinks and iced drinks, but avoiding excessive intake of cold foods is essential to health. Your stomach and spleen, the digestive core of Chinese medicine, like to be cozy and warm.

Imagine a bucket of ice water thrown in your face as a wake-up method. Not pleasant or inspiring. Start your day with warm foods, like congee, oatmeal, and light, cooked grains. For lunch, think of cooling foods; cucumbers, watermelon, and leafy greens. In this weather, many of us crave large, cold salads. Try to let your meal come to room temperature, and include warm, lightly steamed greens and vegetables. Toss with a warm protein. Your body will stay cooler and more comfortable if it is not expending energy to warm up the food before it lands in your stomach. Save dessert for later, if at all.

Your digestive system will appreciate doing less work on a hot day. Think of fruit as its own meal. Use a bowl of berries or a few slices of watermelon as a cooling and delicious snack. In contrast, spicy foods can generate too much internal heat, leading to digestive issues. Barley water or chrysanthemum tea are refreshing at room temperature.

Enjoy the long hours of sunlight by getting up earlier and staying up a little later. Make time for meditation, mindfulness or journaling, preferably outside. A basic, yet great habit is to walk barefoot in the grass. Getting in literal touch with Mother Earth can be calming and healing. Emphasizing the power of Chinese medicine can effectively keep your body in balance with protocols for clearing heat, drying dampness, maintaining digestive health

and strengthening the immune system.


Dr. Sara Youner is the owner of Morning Light Acupuncture, located in Springfield, New Jersey. The practice specializes in treating emotional issues, women’s issues, pain management and facial rejuvenation. She can be contacted at (908) 400-2314. Check out her website at www.morninglightacupuncturenj.com.

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