April 16, 2024
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April 16, 2024
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Linking Northern and Central NJ, Bronx, Manhattan, Westchester and CT

How do we measure progress in the world of Professional Organizing? It’s a fine line when working with a variety clients with different needs. All clients have their own standards of what they want to accomplish, what they are capable of spending and their personal time frame on how long they can commit to achieving their goals.

Because of this I am not an advocate of using stock photos on my website or in my marketing materials. I don’t want to discourage clients who are not able to attain the level of beauty, organization and furnishing in their homes that are represented in the typical stock photos available online. Many clients live in older homes with limited budgets for Professional Organizer services along with realistic expectations and strict timelines.

Some may need a minor tweaking of their master-bedroom closet, which can be done in a reasonable amount of time, resulting in donations to charity and a happy client due to reduction of excess clothing that was causing major distractions getting dressed each morning.

Another client may simply want to clear a room so that it can be used as a study, meditation area or guest room. They may want to use their old comfortable furniture and linens. Just the thought of being able to sit on a bed previously covered in clothing, papers and shoes gives them joy. And even better, the prospect of being able to invite guests to spend the night and enjoy a clutter-free bedroom is a huge source of satisfaction.

And one more example is a client who is ecstatic to see the floor in their den for the first time in years—and we now have space for organizing and staging other projects around the home.

When calling upon a professional organizer to work with you, don’t expect a cookie-cutter assessment. Each project must be customized for your needs and goals, taking your budget, home and furnishings into consideration.

Perhaps success is interpreted as being able to find the screwdriver on the first try, or being able to get out the door on time every morning because your closet is filled with clothing that is laundered and fits. Or perhaps you are relieved that you don’t have to step up three feet to get into the spare bedroom that was filled up to your mid-thigh in unused clothing, shoes, games and papers. Or maybe it’s decluttering a path from your kitchen to your dining room that is free and clear of debris.

I am a big fan of both Vogue and Town & Country Magazines. I love looking at the beautiful photos and reading articles about fashion, travel and places that I may or may not experience in my lifetime. The models are all gorgeous, their makeup is perfect, and the clothing and jewelry are glorious. There is an element of self regulation that is required when one looks at these photos. It can be dangerous to think that by wearing that designer bag or lipstick that you will look runway ready.We all have our own form of inner and outer beauty, as do our homes. Respect that and be realistic about what you want the outcome to be. Unless you have unlimited resources and time, try not to measure your progress against the standards of magazines and blogs filled with unrealistic stock photos.

These photos are lit perfectly most times in rooms that are not lived in. There are no kids with dirty fingers waiting for dinner, pets waiting to be walked and bills to be paid in the inbox. Just like the airbrushed photos of models’ faces and bodies that can set unrealistic expectations for our own selves, it’s the same with your home-organizing project.

Be realistic, be patient and work with your Professional Organizer to prioritize your projects.It takes focus, hard work and trial by error to find the right fit. Progress is measured in small steps and every achievement is to be celebrated.

Happy Organizing!

By Eileen Bergman

Eileen Bergman is a Professional Organizer, a proud member of the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO) and the Institute for Challenging Disorganization (ICD). Eileen may be reached at 973-303-3236 or [email protected].

 

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