April 19, 2024
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April 19, 2024
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The View From the Women’s Section: Thank you, Yakir!

 

Over time there have been many articles written and shiurim given on the subject of tefillah. Some of these have focused on how important it is to understand your tefillot, to make sure to take your time saying each word carefully and sincerely, with concentration.

Other shiurim focus on turning off your phones and not having private audible conversations while others are trying to concentrate. There have been many shiurim given on how important it is for the baal tefillah to try to inspire others through his davening and not speed through it like he is trying to catch a train. Each of these topics are all equally important and need to be addressed.

I grew up in a family where davening was a central part of our lives. My father was an outstanding chazan for close to 30 years in the same shul, and was a chazan for the Yomim Noraim in the New York area for many years as well. My sisters, brother and I were taught at a very young age how important davening was and how shul was a very special place. We were taught how to behave in shul, how to be respectful and how to daven. We were taught that a personal, private connection with Hashem is truly a privilege. This is something that still resonates with me.

I have been going to daven over the past few years three times a day with a minyan. Usually I am the only woman there (except on Shabbos). This was a personal choice that I took upon myself. This allows me the privilege of seeing things from the women’s section with a different perspective.

I would like to share a wonderful experience that occurs in our shul.

The gabbai of the Mincha and Maariv minyan usually will ask if there is a chiyuv who needs to daven for the amud, and if not he will ask if there is someone who would like to volunteer.

Not always is his request met with unbounding enthusiasm—except when Yakir is in shul. Yakir is in eighth grade and recently became bar mitzvah. He is a great all-around kind of kid, sweet and respectful. What is very evident, and what really stands out about Yakir, is that he has a special love for davening; it almost seems to be a part of his soul. When asked if he would like to daven for the amud he almost skips to the spot to lead the minyan with a huge smile. It is almost as if asking him is such a treat for him. In reality it is a treat for us. When the gabbai says thank you Yakir is so gracious, always saying “you are welcome” with a huge smile.

His davening is amazing. (I am quite certain he was influenced by having heard his father lein and daven flawlessly.)

I cannot speak for everyone; however, I am inspired each time he gets up to daven. He makes my davening a bit more meaningful.

How special is it that our shul encourages this young man and gives him the opportunity to lead the minyan? His davening keeps getting better and better. How special is it that each time this young man gets up to daven he has the opportunity to show his great love and true emotion for tefillah? His enthusiasm and joy through his tefillot are contagious. It is truly a win-win situation.

Thank you, Yakir, for your beautiful davening on our behalf.

Thank you, Yakir, for inspiring me each time you daven.

Honny Aron

Member of Shomrei Torah, Fair Lawn

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