June 6, 2024
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What Do Microsoft, Dunkin’ and Tiny Taps Have in Common?

Did you know that Microsoft and Google give away hundreds of millions of dollars every year to tzedakah? With global social tensions at an all-time high, the following rising Jewish leaders are using their achievements to make significant strides in the corporate world and foster impactful societal change at the same time.

Corporate philanthropy refers to the act of corporations and businesses managing their impact on society and promoting the welfare of others, typically through the means of charitable donations, funds or time. This can include employee volunteer programs or partnerships with nonprofit organizations to boost the company’s philanthropic involvement. Successful corporate philanthropy often stems from collaborations between corporations and nonprofit organizations by working together to maximize the impact of their initiatives.

Jewish corporate philanthropy can be defined in two ways: If the head or founder of the company is Jewish or whether the company itself serves a Jewish purpose. This article explores prominent Jewish leaders at the helm of major corporations and promising Jewish start-ups, all engaged in significant philanthropic efforts.

Daniel Lubetzky, founder of KIND, exemplifies this spirit of giving. His corporation operates under the belief that “Being kinder to our bodies and kinder to the planet go hand in hand.” In 2020, Lubetzky launched the Frontline Impact Project to connect companies with frontline institutions, donating five million snack bars globally to support frontline heroes. Additionally, KIND has pledged $100,000 to organizations such as the Equal Justice Initiative and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, demonstrating its commitment to social justice.

William Rosenberg, the founder of Dunkin’, also established a successful corporation that was deeply involved in community service. The Dunkin’ Joy in Childhood Foundation announced $1 million in emergency grant funding for hunger relief organizations in 2020. Their projects extend beyond this, including providing 15 full-time pediatric service dogs to over a dozen children’s hospitals nationwide, supporting hunger relief efforts for various youth organizations, and partnering with The Dimock Center in 2018 to enhance accessible, quality health care and wellness services for all.

These companies are prime examples of how to successfully incorporate philanthropic initiatives into the corporate world. The following start-ups are using the same model to promote social welfare and enhance their overall business.

Tmura, the Israeli Public Service Venture Fund, is revolutionizing philanthropy by facilitating the sale of equity (profit from exits) from Israeli start-up companies and distributing the proceeds to nonprofit organizations that support Israelis in need. Among the remarkable start-ups participating in this initiative are Tiny Taps and Personetics.

Tiny Taps offers a library of educational games curated by professionals, aiming to replace children’s frivolous internet consumption with valuable educational content. Personetics is an AI-based financial advisory platform designed to empower financial institutions to “maximize the value of customer interactions,” ensuring that customers can make well-informed decisions through data-driven personalization. Both companies are making significant contributions to Israeli communities through their innovative solutions.

While Tmura is on the right track by getting start-ups to agree to adding a tzedakah element to their business model, we hope that the nonprofit organization recipients of this aid are those of the highest quality, most efficient and most effective ones. (Sadly, too many nonprofits — including many well-known ones — are not the most efficient users of precious tzedakah shekels.)

When you choose to patronize a business, see if they have a corporate giving policy and then also look into where their grants get distributed. By utilizing this system, you can become a thoughtful consumer while simultaneously becoming a thoughtful agent of tzedakah.


Arnie Draiman is a philanthropic consultant helping people and foundations give their tzedakah money away wisely, efficiently and effectively. He is also a very experienced social media and website guru, and enjoys reviewing restaurants, hotels and tourist attractions. Jamie Berger, from Boca Raton, attended MTVA in Jerusalem and is at the University of Maryland studying business administration. She is looking to pursue a career in finance. Emmie Skydell, from Manhattan, attended MTVA in Jerusalem and is at Binghamton University in New York, studying business administration, looking to pursue a career in marketing and fundraising.

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